University of Nottingham to host the National Windrush Conference

The National Windrush Conference will be hosted at the University of Nottingham on Saturday 17 November 2018, with a focus on conversations and calls for action on the Windrush Scandal.

Presented by Nottingham Windrush Support Forum in partnership with the Windrush Black Lawyers Group, the conference will uniquely bring together three essential pillars – the Legal, Community and Political. Featuring eminent national and local speakers involved in the Windrush Scandal, in addition to a panel and Q&A session, it will encourage urgent, coherent thinking and action on the scandal and the treatment of the Windrush generation.

Attendees at the meeting will:

  • Discuss and update on the current position politically, legally and on community levels
  • Hear first-hand the experiences of Windrushers; their families and the implications of this for our ongoing campaign
  • Explore ways of ensuring that the ongoing campaign becomes more coordinated and has a strong national, strategic, regional and local dimensions.

The intended outcomes of this event will be agreement on the principles of a strong community engagement and media strategy, and a conclusion on key demands borne out of the best legal considerations. It is intended that these demands will be put forward to the UK Government’s Home Secretary and the Prime Minister.

This conference has been convened by the National BAME Lawyers for Justice in association with the Nottingham Windrush Support Forum, the Identities, Citizenship, Equalities and Migration Centre (ICEMIC) in the School of Sociology and Social Policy, and the University of Nottingham more widely.

Professor Cecile Wright, a member of the National Windrush Conference organising committee from the University of Nottingham, said:

“The public outcry regarding the Windrush scandal comes a time of great uncertainty in UK politics. The debate about Brexit has divided the country and brought to the fore key questions about what it means to be British, the notion of ‘who belongs’, who is part of the UK – and most notably, the beginning of a normalisation of what many describe as a ‘hostile environment’ towards those regarded as being ‘the other’.

For Britain’s African Caribbean and African communities, the ongoing treatment of the Windrush generation by the UK Government is the most stark example of this and has unearthed the emergence of strategic campaigning and actions amongst BME communities up and down the country and within national politics and the legal profession. However urgent and more coherent thinking and action is required.”

The conference is free and includes a lunch and refreshments on the day. To register your attendance, visit Eventbrite.

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Other

Applications open for Ingenuity19

Ingenuity19 is looking for the next generation of entrepreneurs and innovators to create scalable social and […]

Brexit & the EU Settlement Scheme

In a new blog, the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Nottingham, Professor Shearer West, has announced […]